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Google doesn’t have a native app for Gmail on the iPhone. I know, it sucks. Thankfully, their mobile Safari-optimized version is pretty damn good. But it’s not perfect. And they’re working to make it better.

This morning, I loaded up the mobile version of the site on my iPhone as was greeted by a shiny new version. The entire look and feel has been mildly revamped: everything is a slightly darker blue hue, and the buttons are now more rounded. But more significantly, buttons have been shifted around — and one key one has been removed altogether.

As you can see in the screenshot, the new Gmail header bar now simply has a “Menu” and a larger “Compose” button alongside the unread count. Gone is both the search button and the reload button. This version wasn’t live long enough for me to check where search went, but I do know that it was auto-refreshing so the reload button was no longer necessary.

If added, this will be a very nice addition. Currently, you have hit the reload button to get new messages as they come in to your account on this mobile version. On the regular web version of Safari, obviously, this is not the case.

This alongside the new Push Notification-enabled version of the Google Mobile App for iPhone makes for a much better push experience with Gmail on the device.

Also new in this update to Gmail is a secondary bar below the main bar that contains the “Archive,” “More,” and “Delete” options. In the current version, these only appear as hover items when an individual message is selected.

We’re always experimenting with new products and ways to enhance and improve our current products. We don’t have any specific plans to share at this time,” is all a Google spokesperson will tell us about the changes.

Considering Google just updated the version of Gmail optimized for the iPad (though this is different looking from that), you can probably look for this revamp soon.

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Facebook has entered the net neutrality debate with a statement critical of the key provisions of Google and Verizon’s net neutrality proposal.

Ever since we found out Google and Verizon were in talks over net neutrality’s future, the web has been awash with an endless stream of opinions, most of them expressing outrage. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is not happy, and neither is the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

Facebook, it seems, isn’t a fan of the Google-Verizon proposal as it’s currently written. Here is the company’s statement (emphasis ours):

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“Facebook continues to support principles of net neutrality for both landline and wireless networks.Preserving an open Internet that is accessible to innovators — regardless of their size or wealth — will promote a vibrant and competitive marketplace where consumers have ultimate control over the content and services delivered through their Internet connections.”

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There are several sections of the proposal that trouble a lot of people, but the biggest sticking point is the exclusion of wireless networks from net neutrality regulations. Verizon and Google exclude it from their proposal for wired connections because “imposition of too many rules up front would not allow us to optimize this network in a fashion that would supercharge the growth we’ve seen in the past.” Critics say that Google and Verizon are trying to protect their own interests, especially their highly profitable Android partnership.

Facebook’s statement doesn’t surprise us; the Google and Facebook are now at war, and allowing Google to define net neutrality on its own terms presents a grave threat to the social network’s business.

For now, expect more of these nuanced statements from all of the parties involved — that is, until the Google-Verizon proposal makes its way to Congress. That’s where you’ll find the real fireworks.

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